Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Catherine Forslund  

Pen Name: None

Genre: Non-Fiction

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Illinois Connection

Professor Forslund has taught at Rockford College since 2000.

Biographical and Professional Information

Catherine Forslund received her bachelor's degree in modern European history from the University of Illinois. After graduation, she pursued other careers, but wound up entering graduate study at Washington University in St. Louis where she earned her Master's and Doctorate in modern United States and U.S. diplomatic history. While in graduate school, Dr. Forslund taught as an adjunct as well as serving for several years as Chair of the Skinker-DeBaliviere Community Council and working in local and state politics.


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

Anna Chennault: Informal Diplomacy and Asian Relations (Biographies in American Foreign Policy, No. 8)
ISBN: 0842028331

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. 2002

She held few government posts, yet she was a strong influence on the course of U.S.-Asian relations in the last half of the twentieth century. She earned the respect of and held the ear of presidents and cabinet members in a time before women were generally accepted in such circles.

The Chinese-born wife of General Claire Chennault of World War II Flying Tigers fame, Anna Chennault was a leader in America's informal relations with East Asia from 1950 to 1990. Informal diplomacy-exchanges between citizens of different nations outside of official institutional apparatus that seek to influence events or governmental attitudes-is an increasingly important avenue of international relations in the modern age. Professor Catherine Forslund's new book, Anna Chennault: Informal Diplomacy and Asian Relations examines Chennault's unique, multifaceted career as an exemplar of American informal diplomacy during the post-World War II era.

Chennault carved a name for herself in her own right in this arena, establishing herself in Republican party politics, the international aviation industry, and in Washington and Asian social circles following her husband's 1958 death. She used her contacts on both sides of the Pacific to achieve informal diplomatic goals that coincided with American national policy: protecting "free" Asian nations from communism and expanding American influence in Asia. Later, Chennault directed her energies toward building ties between Taiwan, China, and the United States.

The book presents a new analysis of Anna Chennault's role in the "October Surprise" of the 1968 presidential election. In addition, Forslund demonstrates how Chennault used gender as an advantage in the male-dominated worlds of foreign relations, politics, and business.

A fascinating look at a woman before her time, this new book is an informative and engaging account of the complex nature of U.S.-Asian relations, diplomatic processes, and the role of women in foreign affairs.


Awards

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