Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Paul Stroble  

Pen Name: Paul E. Stroble

Genre: Non-Fiction

Born: 1957 in Vandalia, Illinois

Sites:

E-Mail:


Illinois Connection

Born and raised in Vandalia (Fayette County), Illinois. He has written books and articles about Vandalia and also refers to Vandalia and Fayette County in his other writings.

Biographical and Professional Information

Currently teaches at Webster University in St. Louis, MO. He has also taught at University of Akron, Indiana University Southeast, Louisville Seminary, and Northern Arizona University. He is an elder in the Illinois Great Rivers Conference of the United Methodist Church.


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

High on the Okaw's Western Bank: Vandalia, Illinois, 1819-39
ISBN: 0252018923

University of Illinois Press. 1992

In this first complete history of Vandalia during its twenty years as the second capital of Illinois, Paul Stroble charts the town's earliest days and discusses its most important figures. He places its history within the context of the frontier community in Illinois, detailing major aspects of economic and political development and exploring cultural and social aspects.
Illinois' government was moved to Vandalia from the state's first capital in Kaskaskia in 1819, then moved again to Springfield twenty years later. During its era as the center of the state's political life, Vandalia grew from being an outpost on the bluffs of the Kaskaskia ("Okaw") River to a thriving community of about nine hundred persons.
Abraham Lincoln began his political career in Vandalia, as did Stephen A. Douglas. The community was also the home of James Hall, the West's first major author.
An examination of the town's business life is based on a thorough study of contemporary newspapers and county government documents. The local leadership's social homogeneity and cooperative character are juxtaposed with the political conflicts of state government and the vicissitudes of local economy caused by the biennial influx of visitors. Stroble discusses the impact of Vandalia's pioneer era on the town's own self-image, as well as how the legends of the capital era were transformed in remembrance and recording.
Vandalia had unusual advantages as a state capital. During the capital period, the social and economic bases of the town were laid by civic-minded citizens and county settlers. Compared to communities elsewhere in Illinois, Vandalia did not grow substantially. Stroble suggests this was due to factors including the newness of the land for an agricultural economy, governmental indifference toward investment in a temporary capital, the uncertainties of civic goal-setting in a new social environment, and the pattern of Illinois settlement during the 1820s and 1830s.

The Social Ontology of Karl Barth
ISBN: 1883255481

Intl Scholars Pubns. 1994

The theme of the "Other" dominates post-Cartesian thinking. Specifically, what is the relation of the knowing subject to the Other (who is neither object nor alter ego), if both self and Other are supposed to be counterparts and partners--a Thou meeting the other's I--and if each exceeds the other's experience? Twentieth-century theology, too, has reconsidered the Cartesian basal subject from which the existence of others and God proceeds. Karl Barth (1886-1968) is a major representative of one approach to this theme. Throughout his theological career Barth tries to overcome a subject-centered theology wherein God is not allowed to appear as God and wherein the claim of the human Other goes unheeded. In Barth's earliest theology, the believer's subjectivity is the locus for God's otherness yet the claim of the Other is said to lodge in God's kingdom as manifested in social democracy. During his "dialectical" period, Barth rejects cultural and social norms, as well as the objectification of God, so that he may affirm the total divine otherness and the divine freedom to speak the Word. In the Church Dogmatics, Barth locates God's otherness in God's triune being, the divine self-correspondence and the divine correspondence to human beings. Human otherness is defined in terms of the human being's being-determined as covenant partner with God and being-for and being-with others in analogous correspondence to the divine self-othering in Christ. During all of Barth's theological periods, otherness is grounded in the unique otherness of Christ, so that the conditions of subjectivity and intersubjectivity alike are grounded in the Incarnation. Stroble suggests lines of dialogue between Barth's theology and postmodern thought, showing paths for future theological reflection.

Adams Street Antiques
ISBN: 0967408601

Paul Stroble. 1999

Novel
Fiction-Christian
Fiction-Antiques
Fiction-Comedy

Journeys home: Thoughts and places
ISBN: 096740861X

Published by the Author. 2000

In this collection of essays, most first published in Springhouse Magazine, Paul Stroble recalls the places and experiences of a small town childhood. Growing up in Vandalia, Illinois at the beginning of the interstate era, Stroble finds his memories enriched by local history, philosophy, landscape geography, and his awareness of family heritage and divine grace as he travels familiar landscapes. He muses over a variety of experiences such as one's first car, mowing the lawn, shopping downtown, going barefoot, sitting impatiently at a railroad crossing, visiting gas stations, going to church, doing genealogy, visiting the family cemetery, and recalling a beloved, fire-destroyed house. "Place is a mirror held up to our lives each time we return to our first homes," he writes, "but place also directly influences us as we move along our lives' journeys. Joy, sorrow, humor, contradictions, and love join together to form a multifaceted, emotional response to place." Traveling through his favorite places, he also realizes, "I've become the nostalgic nuisance I once thought my parents were. Even better, I've incorporated their nostalgia into my own."

Paul and the Galatians: The Life and Letters of Paul
ISBN: 0687090237

Abingdon Press. 2000

This is the second book in the series, The Life and Letters of Paul. It explores the difficult relationship between the Law of the Jews and the Christian faith of the Galatians. Drawing on historical data about the Galatian congregations and their origins, the author explains how Paul understood his audience and tailored his argument to address the particular threats to their faith and their misunderstandings of the relationship between law and freedom. The six sessions are: 1 - Who Were the Galatians? 2 - A "Second String" Apostle? 3 - Faith or Works? 4 - Faith Came First 5 - What Is Liberty? 6 - Life in the Spirit Each session is self-contained and includes study questions for reflection that are all you need to lead a group or to pursue the study on your own. The volumes in “The Life and Letters of Paul” series are especially appropriate for those who want an in-depth study of the Pauline epistles. Key Features: • Use of historical, archaeological, and geographical data for the region • Direct engagement of learners with the Scriptures • Learning helps interspersed with the study text • Based on the New Revised Standard Version Key Benefits: • Helps readers grasp the culture and context from which Paul’s writings emerged Paul and the Galatians explores crucial theological, ethical, and ecclesiastical questions in Paul’s famous epistle. Each session is self-contained and includes questions for reflection. The volumes in “The Life and Letters of Paul” series are especially appropriate for those who want an in-depth study of the Pauline epistles. The six session topics are: Who Were the Galatians? (1:1–10)

A “Second String” Apostle? (1:11–2:10)

Faith or Works? (2:11–2:21)

Faith Came First (3:1–4:7)

What Is Liberty? (4:8–5:24)

and Life in the Spirit (5:25–6:18).

To see another group study offered by Cokesbury, go to the Adult Bible Studies website.

20/30 Bible Study for Young Adults: Mystery: Experiencing the Mystery of God
ISBN: 0687097703

Abingdon Press. 2002

Mystery will introduce young adults to the mysterious ways of God whose work through the Holy Spirit urges and encourages them to find ways to see God at work, to appreciate a sense of the holy, to identify how God actually loves and works through the church, to learn the rudiments of spiritual formation, and to understand and try various spiritual disciplines.

Chapter 1: Unpacking the Mystery in Mystery - Examines mystery and types of spirituality. Chapter 2: God's Mysterious Presence - explores God's presence in the mysteries of pain, death, and the end of time. Chapter 3: The Holy Spirit - explores the idea and reality of God's Spirit Chapter 4: Spiritual Formation - explores spiritual formation as a basis of one's relationship with God Chapter 5: What are Spiritual Disciplines? - examines several practices that help us connect with God. Chapter 6: How Am I Supposed to Worship? - Examines the meaning of worship as a way to praise God and to receive from God. Chapter 7: Put It All Together - Reexamines the link between spiritual growth and God's love.

This study is part of the 20/30: Bible Study for Young Adults series.

Lent 2002 Student Behold His Cross Scriptures for the Church Seasons: A Lenten Study Based on the Revised Common Lectionary
ISBN: 0687098262

Abingdon Press. 2002

This is the lectionary-based offering for Lent known as Scriptures for the Church Seasons. The study includes 7 sessions one for each Sunday in Lent including Easter. They are as follows

1- Grace Abounds More

2 - Abundant Grace Through Faith

3 - All That We Need

4 - Seeing as God Sees

5 - For Death, No Victory

6 - The Journey to Golgotha

7 - Behold Our Savior! (see the separate leader's guide #068709819X)

FaithQuestions - What Do Other Faiths Believe?: A Study of World Religions (Faithquestions Series ID 45458)
ISBN: 0687075505

Abingdon Press. 2003

This in-depth study will have 6-8 sessions. In it the author interviews leaders in Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and other faiths to explore how the beliefs and practices of these religions are similar to and different from basic Christian beliefs. Religious tolerance will be promoted by the understanding of other religions’ beliefs about sin, forgiveness, salvation, future beyond death, ethics, etc.

You Gave Me a Wide Place: Holy Places of Our Lives
ISBN: 083581002X

Upper Room. 2006

You gave me a wide place for my steps under me, and my feet did not slip-Psalm 18:36 Places are part of our personal story and can be important keys to understanding God's presence in our life. Whether the sacred place lies at the water's edge, in a quiet small town or in pristine high-country mountains, all have felt pulled and connected to a spot. Perhaps at the least likely moment you felt touched by God's presence just when you needed it most, even if it was in a mundane, public place. No matter how remote or ordinary your special place is, God was (and is) already there - waiting to touch your life.

What About Religion and Science?: A Study of Faith and Reason (Faithquestions)
ISBN: 0687641624

Abingdon Press. 2007

This book invites us to consider ways to remain confident in our faith as we understand and appreciate the discoveries and advances of science. How can Christians integrate, believe, or accept all the teachings of science, the Bible, and Christian tradition? How can we believe in both the discoveries of science and the Bible? Are science and religion compatible or incompatible? Does the Christian understanding that God created the universe exclude the findings and discoveries of science? What is the role of faith in the world of education? What can we believe about intelligent design? If we believe in evolution, can we believe in God? Does the Big Bang theory exclude God? If we are Christians, can we support stem-cell research and cloning? Can science help us understand the afterlife? Does science negate or support prayer? What is the difference between faith and reason? Do they exclude or complement one another? As Paul Stroble addresses these questions and others, he helps us examine different possible ways that religion and science relate to each other and ways that science and religion provide meaning and value in our lives.

PAUL STROBLE is an elder of the Illinois Great Rivers Conference of The United Methodist Church. He has served both as parish pastor and college instructor and currently teaches at the University of Akron, where he earned an Excellence in Teaching award. He is a long-time writer-researcher for the United Methodist curriculum FaithLink and author of numerous articles and curricular materials. Among his eleven books are Paul and the Galatians and What Do Other Faiths Believe? He is married to Dr. Beth Stroble, and they have a daughter, Emily.

The FaithQuestions study series is designed to meet the needs of people who have questions about the Christian faith and who desire a deeper engagement with scripture and with discipleship as they explore studies of issues in theology, ethics, missions, Bible interpretation, and church history. It seeks to equip a new generation of church leaders to appreciate the eternal message of the gospel and to develop the skills to articulate its relevance in our contemporary context. The series would be a good choice for users who have completed Disciple.
this will be the ninth study in the series, following What About the Rapture -
What Do Other Faiths Believe - What Happens When We Die -
What About Divine Healing - What About the Trinity - What About Forgiveness
- What About the Devil - What About Reading the Bible

What's in the Bible About Jesus?: What's in the Bible and Why Should I Care? (Why Is That in the Bible and Why Should I Care?)
ISBN: 0687653835

Abingdon Press. 2008

What’s in the Bible about Jesus?

What is the Bible

all about? What's in it? Why is it so important for Christians? Is it really relevant for people in the 21st century? Should I care about what's in the Bible? Why? What difference will it make in my life? The study series, What's in the Bible and Why Should I Care? offers opportunities to explore these questions and others by opening the Bible, reading it, prayerfully reflecting on what the Bible readings say, and applying the readings to daily life.

The title of this unique and exciting Bible study series points to the two essential features of meaningful Bible study: reading the Bible and applying the Bible to life. First, we read the Bible to discover answers to the question What’s in the Bible? and second, we reflect upon what we read in order to discover answers to the question, Why Should I Care? and apply these answers to our lives.

What’s in the Bible about Jesus? is one of the study books in the series, What’s in the Bible and Why Should I Care? What’s in the Bible About Jesus? will help readers explore who Jesus is, what he said and did when he walked the earth, and how Christians can relate to God and to one another through Jesus. Chapters include: “Who Is Jesus?” , “What Did Jesus Say?”, “What Did Jesus Do?”, and “How Can We Respond to Jesus?”.

Each chapter contains the following features:

Bible Readings - Each chapter explores specific readings from the Bible.

The Questions – Each chapter begins with focus questions that will be explored in the Bible readings and the chapter information.

A Psalm – Each chapter begins with verses from a psalm. These excerpts from the psalms give readers the experience of using the Bible for personal and group devotion.

A Prayer – A brief two or three sentence prayer at the beginning and end of each chapter

What's in the Bible? Participants will read and reflect upon key Bible readings in each chapter and use the space provided to write personal and private reflections.

Reflection Questions – These questions are related to the chapter information and are designed to help the reader consider key ideas that emerge from this information and from the Bible readings.

Bible Facts – Additional related information about the Bible readings.

Here's Why I Care – This activity near the end of each chapter contains questions that invite the readers to grow in faith as they prayerfully reflect about what they have learned

What's in the Bible About Life Together?: What's in the Bible and Why Should I Care? (Why Is That in the Bible and Why Should I Care?)
ISBN: 0687653045

Abingdon Press. 2009

What’s in the Bible about Life Together?

What is the Bible is all about?

What's in it?

Why is it so important for Christians? Is it really relevant for people in the 21st century?

Should I care about what's in the Bible? Why? What difference will it make in my life?

The study series, What's in the Bible and Why Should I Care? offers opportunities to explore these questions and others by opening the Bible, reading it, prayerfully reflecting on what the Bible readings say, and applying the readings to daily life.

The title of this unique and exciting Bible study series points to the two essential features of meaningful Bible study: reading the Bible and applying the Bible to life. First, we read the Bible to discover answers to the question What’s in the Bible? and second, we reflect upon what we read in order to discover answers to the question, Why Should I Care? and apply these answers to our lives.

What’s in the Bible about Life Together? is one of the study books in the series, What’s in the Bible and Why Should I Care? What’s in the Bible About Life Together? will help readers explore how living God’s way contributes to whole and holy life together as God’s people. Chapters include: The Law Reveals God's Way of Life, The Prophets Challenge Us to Return to God’s Way, Jesus Teaches God’s Way, Jesus Invites Us into God’s Kingdom

Each chapter contains the following features:

Bible Readings - Each chapter explores specific readings from the Bible.

The Questions – Each chapter begins with focus questions that will be explored in the Bible readings and the chapter information.

A Psalm – Each chapter begins with verses from a psalm.

These excerpts from the psalms give readers the experience of using the Bible for personal and group devotion.

A Prayer – A brief two or three sentence prayer at the beginning and end of each chapter

What's in the Bible? Participants will read and reflect upon key Bible readings in each chapter and use the space provided to write personal and private reflections.

Reflection Questions – These questions are related to the chapter information and are designed to help the reader consider key ideas that emerge from this information and from the Bible readings.

Bible Facts – Additional related information about the Bible readings.

Here's Why I Care – This activity near the end of each chapter contains questions that invite the readers to grow in faith as they prayerfully reflect about what they have learned


Awards

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Illinois State Historical Society, 1993 Certificate of Excellence for High on the Okaw's Western Bank

National Council on Religion and Public Education, 1993 Thayer S. Warshaw Essay Award (with Dr. Beth Stroble)

The United Methodist Association of Communicators, 2005, Certificate of Excellence (as a FaithLink curriculum team member)