Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  David J. Gunkel  

Pen Name: None

Genre: Non-Fiction

Born:

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Illinois Connection

Gunkel is professor at Northern Illinois University.

Biographical and Professional Information

David J. Gunkel is an award-winning educator and scholar. He is a professor in the Department of Communication at Northern Illinois University, where he teaches and researches interactive media programming and design, communication technology, and philosophy of technology. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from DePaul University, has won awards for interactive media design.Along with the books listed below, Gunkel has written and published over thirty five articles, book reviews, and book chapters in peer-reviewed scholarly journals and anthologies. He also co-edited [http://www.amazon.com/Transgression-2-0-Culture-Politics-Digital/dp/1441168338/ref=la_B001JS36XK_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1403795082&sr=1-3 Transgression 2.0: Media, Culture, and the Politics of a Digital Age] with Ted Gournelos.


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

The Machine Question: Critical Perspectives on AI, Robots, and Ethics (MIT Press)
ISBN: 0262017431

The MIT Press. 2012

An investigation into the assignment of moral responsibilities and rights to intelligent and autonomous machines of our own making.

One of the enduring concerns of moral philosophy is deciding who or what is deserving of ethical consideration. Much recent attention has been devoted to the "animal question" -- consideration of the moral status of nonhuman animals. In this book, David Gunkel takes up the "machine question": whether and to what extent intelligent and autonomous machines of our own making can be considered to have legitimate moral responsibilities and any legitimate claim to moral consideration.

The machine question poses a fundamental challenge to moral thinking, questioning the traditional philosophical conceptualization of technology as a tool or instrument to be used by human agents. Gunkel begins by addressing the question of machine moral agency: whether a machine might be considered a legitimate moral agent that could be held responsible for decisions and actions. He then approaches the machine question from the other side, considering whether a machine might be a moral patient due legitimate moral consideration. Finally, Gunkel considers some recent innovations in moral philosophy and critical theory that complicate the machine question, deconstructing the binary agent--patient opposition itself.

Technological advances may prompt us to wonder if the science fiction of computers and robots whose actions affect their human companions (think of HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey) could become science fact. Gunkel's argument promises to influence future considerations of ethics, ourselves, and the other entities who inhabit this world.

Thinking Otherwise: Philosophy, Communication, Technology
ISBN: 1557534365

Purdue University Press. 2007

Ethics is customarily understood as being concerned with questions of responsibility for and in the face of an other who is like we assume ourselves to be. Such an anthropocentric presumption has been significantly challenged by computer technology, intelligent systems, virtual realities, and cybernetics, all of which introduce the possibility of others that are and remain otherwise. Thinking Otherwise investigates the unique challenges, complications, and possibilities introduced by these different forms of otherness. The author formulates alternative ways of proceeding that are able to respond to and to be responsible for these other different forms of otherness in order to generate and develop alternative ways of thinking that are and remain oriented otherwise.

Hacking Cyberspace (Polemics Series,)
ISBN: 0813336694

Westview Press. 2001

In Hacking Cyberspace David J. Gunkel examines the metaphors applied to new technologies, and how those metaphors inform, shape, and drive the implementation of the technology in question. The author explores the metaphorical tropes that have been employed to describe and evaluate recent advances in computer technology, telecommunications systems, and interactive media. Taking the stance that no speech is value-neutral, Gunkel examines such metaphors as "the information superhighway" and "the electronic frontier" for their political and social content, and he develops a critical investigation that not only traces the metaphors' conceptual history, but explicates their implications and consequences for technological development. Through Hacking Cyberspace, David J. Gunkel develops a sophisticated understanding of new technology that takes into account the effect of technoculture's own discursive techniques and maneuvers on the actual form of technological development.


Awards

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